News

FEDS SEIZE OVER 1 BILLION IN COCAINE TODAY Less

FEDS SEIZE OVER 1 BILLION IN COCAINE TODAY

More than $1 billion worth of cocaine has been seized at the Philadelphia Port on Tuesday, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. They say the drug bust netted approximately 16.5 tons of the narcotic from a cargo ship docked at the Packer Marine Terminal. It is the largest coke bust in history in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, CBS Philadelphia reported, and the third largest in U.S. history, a senior official at the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) told CBS News.

 

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/philadelphia-drug-bust-feds-seize-over-1-billio n-cocaine-today-port-live-updates-2019-06-18

More than $1 billion worth of cocaine has been seized at the Philadelphia Port on Tuesday, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. They say the drug bust netted approximately 16.5 tons of the narcotic from a cargo ship docked at the Packer Marine Terminal. It is the largest coke bust in history in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, CBS Philadelphia reported, and the third largest in U.S. history, a senior official at the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) told CBS News.

 

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/philadelphia-drug-bust-feds-seize-over-1-billio n-cocaine-today-port-live-updates-2019-06-18

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Initial US assessment blames Iran for ship attacksLess
Initial US assessment blames Iran for ship attacks

WASHINGTON (AP) — An American military team’s initial assessment is that Iranian or Iranian-backed proxies used explosives Sunday to blow large holes in four ships anchored off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, a U.S. official said Monday.



The official said each ship has a 5- to 10-foot hole in it, near or just below the water line, and the team’s early belief is that the holes were caused by explosive charges. The team of U.S. military experts was sent to investigate the damages at the request of the UAE, but American officials have not provided any details about what exactly happened or any proof as yet about the possible Iranian involvement in the explosions.


The official was not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. Gulf officials have characterized the damage to the tankers as sabotage. Two Saudi oil tankers, a Norwegian-flagged vessel, and a bunkering tanker flagged in Sharjah, one of the UAE’s seven emirates, all suffered similar damage Sunday. 


The U.S. has warned ships that “Iran or its proxies” could be targeting maritime traffic in the region, and America has moved additional ships and aircraft into the region.



The incident comes after months of increasing diplomatic and economic pressure on Iran, which the U.S. accuses of threatening American interests and allies in the region, including Saudi Arabia and the UAE.


For full details CLICK HERE.

WASHINGTON (AP) — An American military team’s initial assessment is that Iranian or Iranian-backed proxies used explosives Sunday to blow large holes in four ships anchored off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, a U.S. official said Monday.


The official said each ship has a 5- to 10-foot hole in it, near or just below the water line, and the team’s early belief is that the holes were caused by explosive charges. The team of U.S. military experts was sent to investigate the damages at the request of the UAE, but American officials have not provided any details about what exactly happened or any proof as yet about the possible Iranian involvement in the explosions.

The official was not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. Gulf officials have characterized the damage to the tankers as sabotage. Two Saudi oil tankers, a Norwegian-flagged vessel, and a bunkering tanker flagged in Sharjah, one of the UAE’s seven emirates, all suffered similar damage Sunday. 

The U.S. has warned ships that “Iran or its proxies” could be targeting maritime traffic in the region, and America has moved additional ships and aircraft into the region.


The incident comes after months of increasing diplomatic and economic pressure on Iran, which the U.S. accuses of threatening American interests and allies in the region, including Saudi Arabia and the UAE.


For full details CLICK HERE.

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U.S. Coast Year in Review for 2018 

U.S. Coast Year in Review for 2018 

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CG-FAC continues to be at the forefront of developing guidance and other
 resources to address cyber safety, security, and cyber risk management  within the MTS. The continually increasing role of cyber systems and the  need to ensure the safety and security of ever-evolving technology and  systems, for both information technology and operational technology, in the MTS was a strategic priority of FAC's work this past year. The draft cyber Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) underwent thorough review 

and updates based on public comments, as well as through Coast Guard legal
 offices before making its way to DHS. The incorporation of comments and extensive legal review highlighted our commitment to working with stakeholders and ensured the best possible way forward for cyber risk management. CG-FAC also continued efforts to enhance cybersecurity and cyber risk management in the MTS through the development of a "Cyber in the MTS 101" webinar, published pertinent information and available resources for the maritime community on the Coast Guard's Maritime Commons blog, and remained actively engaged in key partnerships and working groups. Most importantly, CG-FAC is extremely proud to support the Coast Guard men and women who, in 2018, completed over 5,400 security compliance inspections required by the SAFE Port Act of 20061 , over 53,000 visual and electronic inspections of Transportation Worker Identification Credentials2 , and more than 26,000 container inspections3 . Maintaining a strong operational presence on the waterfront is key to safe and secure ports. In addition, Port Security Specialists oversaw the coordination of 105 events that tested the effectiveness of their respective port-level Area Maritime Security (AMS) plans and supported maritime security preparedness regimes through the engagement of federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government and private sector stakeholders. We are equally grateful to the many facility operators, port workers, mariners, and other agency personnel whose patriotism and hard work are equally vital to our success. 


For full details CLICK HERE.

CG-FAC continues to be at the forefront of developing guidance and other  resources to address cyber safety, security, and cyber risk management  within the MTS. The continually increasing role of cyber systems and the  need to ensure the safety and security of ever-evolving technology and  systems, for both information technology and operational technology, in the MTS was a strategic priority of FAC's work this past year. The draft cyber Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) underwent thorough review 

and updates based on public comments, as well as through Coast Guard legal  offices before making its way to DHS. The incorporation of comments and extensive legal review highlighted our commitment to working with stakeholders and ensured the best possible way forward for cyber risk management. CG-FAC also continued efforts to enhance cybersecurity and cyber risk management in the MTS through the development of a "Cyber in the MTS 101" webinar, published pertinent information and available resources for the maritime community on the Coast Guard's Maritime Commons blog, and remained actively engaged in key partnerships and working groups. Most importantly, CG-FAC is extremely proud to support the Coast Guard men and women who, in 2018, completed over 5,400 security compliance inspections required by the SAFE Port Act of 20061 , over 53,000 visual and electronic inspections of Transportation Worker Identification Credentials2 , and more than 26,000 container inspections3 . Maintaining a strong operational presence on the waterfront is key to safe and secure ports. In addition, Port Security Specialists oversaw the coordination of 105 events that tested the effectiveness of their respective port-level Area Maritime Security (AMS) plans and supported maritime security preparedness regimes through the engagement of federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government and private sector stakeholders. We are equally grateful to the many facility operators, port workers, mariners, and other agency personnel whose patriotism and hard work are equally vital to our success. 


For full details CLICK HERE.

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The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi has issued a warrant for the arrest of the heavy lift ship MV Hawk.

The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi has issued a warrant for the arrest of the heavy lift ship MV Hawk.

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The MV Hawk was at the center of a March 29 incident in which, according to  media reports, it slammed into a test barge at Ingalls Shipbuilding, pushing the barge into the newbuild destroyer USS Delbert Black (DDG 119).The MV Hawk, which was delivering a Chinese built floating dry dock to the shipyard at the time of the incident, is owned by Offshore Heavy Transport of Oslo, Norway, and managed by Songa Shipmanagement. The arrest warrant was issued Monday, April 15, in response to a civil complaint filed by Ingalls' parent, Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), against OHT Hawk AS, Offshore Heavy Transport AS, Songa Shipmanagement Ltd, and the MV Hawk,In its complaint, HII asserts that as the MV Hawk approached the HII berth, it lost control, veered off course, and allided with HII's test barge and the USS Delbert D.
 
Black (DDG 119), causing significant damage to the test barge, the floating dry dock, HII's wharf facilities and the destroyer' According to the complaint, HII currently estimates its damages to be as follows: a) Damage and repair to the HII test barge and wharf facilities - $10.1 million dollars; b) Delay and disruption of HII' s facilities $21.1 million dollars. The complaint also asserts that HII has suffered additional damages due to the allision, which amounts will be proven at trial, and says the current damage estimates are for HII's damages only and do not include the damage sustained by the U.S. Navy to repair allision damage to the USS Delbert D. Black, which HII estimates is approximately $30.9 million, plus additional delay and disruption damages the Navy may have sustained as a result of the allision. 


For full details click here.

The MV Hawk was at the center of a March 29 incident in which, according to  media reports, it slammed into a test barge at Ingalls Shipbuilding, pushing the barge into the newbuild destroyer USS Delbert Black (DDG 119).The MV Hawk, which was delivering a Chinese built floating dry dock to the shipyard at the time of the incident, is owned by Offshore Heavy Transport of Oslo, Norway, and managed by Songa Shipmanagement. The arrest warrant was issued Monday, April 15, in response to a civil complaint filed by Ingalls' parent, Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), against OHT Hawk AS, Offshore Heavy Transport AS, Songa Shipmanagement Ltd, and the MV Hawk,In its complaint, HII asserts that as the MV Hawk approached the HII berth, it lost control, veered off course, and allided with HII's test barge and the USS Delbert D.  Black (DDG 119), causing significant damage to the test barge, the floating dry dock, HII's wharf facilities and the destroyer' According to the complaint, HII currently estimates its damages to be as follows: a) Damage and repair to the HII test barge and wharf facilities - $10.1 million dollars; b) Delay and disruption of HII' s facilities $21.1 million dollars. The complaint also asserts that HII has suffered additional damages due to the allision, which amounts will be proven at trial, and says the current damage estimates are for HII's damages only and do not include the damage sustained by the U.S. Navy to repair allision damage to the USS Delbert D. Black, which HII estimates is approximately $30.9 million, plus additional delay and disruption damages the Navy may have sustained as a result of the allision. 


For full details click here.

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Maritime Defense Strategy LLC Receives Approval For Two U.S.Coast Guard Courses Less

Maritime Defense Strategy LLC Receives Approval For Two U.S.Coast Guard Courses 

Maritime Defense Strategy, LLC received approval from the U.S. Coast Guard
 in two MTSA Maritime Transportation Security Act 2002 courses. Maritime Defense Strategy now hold certifications in the course of Facility Security Officer and Personnel with Security Duties 

Maritime Defense Strategy, LLC received approval from the U.S. Coast Guard  in two MTSA Maritime Transportation Security Act 2002 courses. Maritime Defense Strategy now hold certifications in the course of Facility Security Officer and Personnel with Security Duties 

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Coast Guard Participates In Military Outload OperationLess

Coast Guard Participates In Military Outload Operation

NEW ORLEANS – The Coast Guard worked with partners as part of the Port Readiness Committee, to ensure the safe and secure loading off military equipment in the Port of Gulfport, Mississippi.

NEW ORLEANS – The Coast Guard worked with partners as part of the Port Readiness Committee, to ensure the safe and secure loading off military equipment in the Port of Gulfport, Mississippi.

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Along with partners from the Port Readiness Committee, Coast Guard Sector Mobile, oversaw the loading of approximately 156 pieces of military equipment.

Along with partners from the Port Readiness Committee, Coast Guard Sector Mobile, oversaw the loading of approximately 156 pieces of military equipment.

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Agencies and partners that support these operations and the Port Readiness Committee include the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Transportation Command, U.S. Army 842nd Transportation Battalion, U.S. Maritime Administration, Transportation Security Administration, Mississippi State Port Authority, Gulfport Police Department, City of Gulfport, Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Gulfport Fire Department, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Harrison County EMA, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Southern Technical Aquatic Resource and Rescue, Maritime Defense Strategy and the Mississippi State Pilots Association.

Agencies and partners that support these operations and the Port Readiness Committee include the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Transportation Command, U.S. Army 842nd Transportation Battalion, U.S. Maritime Administration, Transportation Security Administration, Mississippi State Port Authority, Gulfport Police Department, City of Gulfport, Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Gulfport Fire Department, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Harrison County EMA, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Southern Technical Aquatic Resource and Rescue, Maritime Defense Strategy and the Mississippi State Pilots Association.

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The Port Readiness Committee's goal is to ensure safe and secure vessel, harbor and pier side operations – cargo transportation, staging, loading, stowage, vessel transits, and shipboard safety systems efficiently as possible with little disruption to other port operations.

The Port Readiness Committee's goal is to ensure safe and secure vessel, harbor and pier side operations – cargo transportation, staging, loading, stowage, vessel transits, and shipboard safety systems efficiently as possible with little disruption to other port operations.

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For full details click the link below. 

For full details click the link below. 

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U.S. Coast Guard Seafarers' Access to Maritime Facilities Final Rule publishedLess

U.S. Coast Guard Seafarers' Access to Maritime Facilities Final Rule published

The Coast Guard published the Seafarers' Access to Maritime Facilities Final Rule in the Federal Register April 1, 2019, requiring owners and operators of Maritime Transportation Security Act-regulated facilities to provide seafarers holding valid U.S. visas and other covered individuals with the ability to transit through the facility in a timely manner and at no cost to the individuals.



Under this rule, each owner or operator of a maritime facility regulated by the Coast Guard is required to implement a system providing seafarers, pilots, and representatives of seamen's welfare and labor organizations access between vessels moored at the facility and the facility gate, in a timely manner and at no cost to the seafarer or other individuals. The final rule provides regulatory flexibility to owners and operators to determine the method of shore access that best suits the size and function of their facility. These methods may include, but are not limited to, providing regularly scheduled or on-call shuttle service, taxi service, arrangements with seafarers' welfare organizations, or monitoring of pedestrian routes. 



The access procedures must be documented in the Facility Security Plan for each facility, and approved by the local Captain of the Port. Although the final rule is effective May 1, 2019, each facility owner or operator has 14 months after publication of the final rule (June 1, 2020) to implement a system. This delayed implementation allows the Captain of the Port to work with each facility in the event of deficiencies in the plan.  


For full details click the link below. 


https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/04/01/2019-06272/seafarers-access-to-maritime-facilities?fbclid=iwar3asavvznb_yhwbatmievpx3dwwaxrpkl-znx3z3wehz9b7di9luvansoo  



https://mariners.coastguard.dodlive.mil/2019/04/01/4-1-2019-seafarers-access-to-maritime-facilities-final-rule-published/

The Coast Guard published the Seafarers' Access to Maritime Facilities Final Rule in the Federal Register April 1, 2019, requiring owners and operators of Maritime Transportation Security Act-regulated facilities to provide seafarers holding valid U.S. visas and other covered individuals with the ability to transit through the facility in a timely manner and at no cost to the individuals.


Under this rule, each owner or operator of a maritime facility regulated by the Coast Guard is required to implement a system providing seafarers, pilots, and representatives of seamen's welfare and labor organizations access between vessels moored at the facility and the facility gate, in a timely manner and at no cost to the seafarer or other individuals. The final rule provides regulatory flexibility to owners and operators to determine the method of shore access that best suits the size and function of their facility. These methods may include, but are not limited to, providing regularly scheduled or on-call shuttle service, taxi service, arrangements with seafarers' welfare organizations, or monitoring of pedestrian routes. 


The access procedures must be documented in the Facility Security Plan for each facility, and approved by the local Captain of the Port. Although the final rule is effective May 1, 2019, each facility owner or operator has 14 months after publication of the final rule (June 1, 2020) to implement a system. This delayed implementation allows the Captain of the Port to work with each facility in the event of deficiencies in the plan.  


For full details click the link below. 


https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/04/01/2019-06272/seafarers-access-to-maritime-facilities?fbclid=iwar3asavvznb_yhwbatmievpx3dwwaxrpkl-znx3z3wehz9b7di9luvansoo  


https://mariners.coastguard.dodlive.mil/2019/04/01/4-1-2019-seafarers-access-to-maritime-facilities-final-rule-published/

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U.S. Coast Guard Request Comments on the TWIC Card Program Less

U.S. Coast Guard Request Comments on the TWIC Card Program

The Transportation Worker Identification Credential Accountability Act of 2018, passed August 2, 2018, restricts the U.S. Coast Guard from implementing the TWIC Reader Rule until the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) submits a study to Congress that assesses the security and risk mitigation value of the underlying TWIC program.



As part of this study, DHS has issued a 60-Day Notice of Information Collection and is seeking public comments on the risk-mitigation value of TWIC at maritime facilities until April 8, 2019.



https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2019-02-07/html/2019-01377.htm 

The Transportation Worker Identification Credential Accountability Act of 2018, passed August 2, 2018, restricts the U.S. Coast Guard from implementing the TWIC Reader Rule until the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) submits a study to Congress that assesses the security and risk mitigation value of the underlying TWIC program.


As part of this study, DHS has issued a 60-Day Notice of Information Collection and is seeking public comments on the risk-mitigation value of TWIC at maritime facilities until April 8, 2019.


https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2019-02-07/html/2019-01377.htm 

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U.S. Coast Guard latest developments regarding TWIC Reader Final Rule LessLess

U.S. Coast Guard latest developments regarding TWIC Reader Final Rule
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The President of the United States signed into law Aug. 2, 2018, the Transportation Worker Identification Credential Accountability Act of 2018 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/5729?q={"search":["5729"]}&r=1> HR.5729. This prohibits the Coast Guard from implementing the rule requiring electronic inspections of Transportation Worker Identification Credentials until after the Department of Homeland Security has submitted an assessment of the TWIC program to Congress.



Additionally, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia issued a court order July 24, 2018, delaying the TWIC Reader Final Rule implementation at Certain Dangerous Cargo transfer and non-transfer facilities until further order of the Court, in response to a lawsuit brought by industry groups.



The Coast Guard received 13 comments before the TWIC Reader Rule Notice of Proposed Rulemaking comment period closed July 23, 2018. The Coast Guard values public participation in the rulemaking process and looks forward to engaging further with industry. To view the comments, please visit



http://regulations.gov



https://www.regulations.gov/searchResults?rpp=25&po=0&s=USCG-2017-0711&fp=true&ns=true> USCG-2017-0711



https://mariners.coastguard.dodlive.mil/2018/08/03/8-3-2018-latest-developments-regarding-twic-reader-final-rule/


The President of the United States signed into law Aug. 2, 2018, the Transportation Worker Identification Credential Accountability Act of 2018 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/5729?q={"search":["5729"]}&r=1> HR.5729. This prohibits the Coast Guard from implementing the rule requiring electronic inspections of Transportation Worker Identification Credentials until after the Department of Homeland Security has submitted an assessment of the TWIC program to Congress.


Additionally, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia issued a court order July 24, 2018, delaying the TWIC Reader Final Rule implementation at Certain Dangerous Cargo transfer and non-transfer facilities until further order of the Court, in response to a lawsuit brought by industry groups.


The Coast Guard received 13 comments before the TWIC Reader Rule Notice of Proposed Rulemaking comment period closed July 23, 2018. The Coast Guard values public participation in the rulemaking process and looks forward to engaging further with industry. To view the comments, please visit


http://regulations.gov


https://www.regulations.gov/searchResults?rpp=25&po=0&s=USCG-2017-0711&fp=true&ns=true> USCG-2017-0711


https://mariners.coastguard.dodlive.mil/2018/08/03/8-3-2018-latest-developments-regarding-twic-reader-final-rule/


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HOMEPORT requirement for Facility Security Officers Less

HOMEPORT requirement for Facility Security Officers 



Facility Security Officers Sign up with Homeport today to ensure your meeting 33CFR105

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) Homeport Internet Portal (HIP) was established in 2005 to facilitate compliance with the requirements set forth in the Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) of 2002, by providing secure information dissemination, advanced collaboration, electronic submission and approval for vessel and facility security plans, and complex electronic and telecommunication notification capabilities. 

Since its inception, HIP has been expanded to provide additional support such as Transportation Worker Identification Card New Hire; Electronic Vessel Response Plan; Marine Event Permit Process; Port Status Indicator; Merchant Mariner Licensing and Documentation; Marine Training and Assessment Data (training documentation); Merchant Mariner Certificate; Sea Service Calculator; Merchant Mariner Verification of Certificates; and Merchant Mariner Credential Survey 

The Coast Guard has launch Homeport 2.0 in order to provide a better user experience and improve the security of user information. Upgrades will include fewer site navigation menus and more efficient and secure search functions.

https://homeport.uscg.mil/ 



Facility Security Officers Sign up with Homeport today to ensure your meeting 33CFR105

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) Homeport Internet Portal (HIP) was established in 2005 to facilitate compliance with the requirements set forth in the Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) of 2002, by providing secure information dissemination, advanced collaboration, electronic submission and approval for vessel and facility security plans, and complex electronic and telecommunication notification capabilities. 

Since its inception, HIP has been expanded to provide additional support such as Transportation Worker Identification Card New Hire; Electronic Vessel Response Plan; Marine Event Permit Process; Port Status Indicator; Merchant Mariner Licensing and Documentation; Marine Training and Assessment Data (training documentation); Merchant Mariner Certificate; Sea Service Calculator; Merchant Mariner Verification of Certificates; and Merchant Mariner Credential Survey 

The Coast Guard has launch Homeport 2.0 in order to provide a better user experience and improve the security of user information. Upgrades will include fewer site navigation menus and more efficient and secure search functions.

https://homeport.uscg.mil/ 

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What are MARSEC Level(s) Less

What are MARSEC Level(s)

The Coast Guard employs a three-tiered system of Maritime Security (MARSEC) Levels designed to easily communicate to the Coast Guard and our maritime industry partners pre-planned scalable responses for credible threats. If the Secretary of Homeland Security issues an NTAS Alert, the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard will adjust MARSEC Level, if appropriate, based on the commensurate risk, any maritime nexus, and/or Commandant consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security. 

MARSEC Levels are set to reflect the prevailing threat environment to the marine elements of the national transportation system, including ports, vessels, facilities, and critical assets and infrastructure located on or adjacent to waters subject to the jurisdiction of the U.S. MARSEC Levels apply to vessels, Coast Guard-regulated facilities inside the U.S., and to the Coast Guard.


  • MARSEC Level 1 means the level for which minimum appropriate security measures shall be maintained at all times.

  • MARSEC Level 2 means the level for which appropriate additional protective security measures shall be maintained for a period of time as a result of heightened risk of a transportation security incident.

  • MARSEC Level 3 means the level for which further specific protective security measures shall be maintained for a limited period of time when a transportation security incident is probable, imminent, or has occurred, although it may not be possible to identify the specific target.


MARSEC Level 1 generally applies in the absence of an NTAS Alert or when the Commandant determines that the Alert is not applicable to the Marine Transportation System. If an NTAS Alert is applicable, the Commandant will consider a MARSEC Level change for the maritime industry, Coast Guard, or both.


https://www.uscg.mil/what-is-marsec/ 

The Coast Guard employs a three-tiered system of Maritime Security (MARSEC) Levels designed to easily communicate to the Coast Guard and our maritime industry partners pre-planned scalable responses for credible threats. If the Secretary of Homeland Security issues an NTAS Alert, the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard will adjust MARSEC Level, if appropriate, based on the commensurate risk, any maritime nexus, and/or Commandant consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security. 

MARSEC Levels are set to reflect the prevailing threat environment to the marine elements of the national transportation system, including ports, vessels, facilities, and critical assets and infrastructure located on or adjacent to waters subject to the jurisdiction of the U.S. MARSEC Levels apply to vessels, Coast Guard-regulated facilities inside the U.S., and to the Coast Guard.

  • MARSEC Level 1 means the level for which minimum appropriate security measures shall be maintained at all times.

  • MARSEC Level 2 means the level for which appropriate additional protective security measures shall be maintained for a period of time as a result of heightened risk of a transportation security incident.

  • MARSEC Level 3 means the level for which further specific protective security measures shall be maintained for a limited period of time when a transportation security incident is probable, imminent, or has occurred, although it may not be possible to identify the specific target.


MARSEC Level 1 generally applies in the absence of an NTAS Alert or when the Commandant determines that the Alert is not applicable to the Marine Transportation System. If an NTAS Alert is applicable, the Commandant will consider a MARSEC Level change for the maritime industry, Coast Guard, or both.

https://www.uscg.mil/what-is-marsec/ 

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"Maritime Defense Strategy, LLC provides excellent work and are very knowledgeable. Their compliance audits are very extensive and help ensure the client understands not only what is required but why and what you can do to meet the requirements. Great company and good people to work with."

Rob Carney- Ergon Refining- Vicksburg, MS